Sociology

Graduate Policy Fellow 2021

Chloe Sariego is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Women, Gender, and Sexuality studies. Broadly conceived, her research examines the cultural, social, and historical processes through which bodies, nations, and their borders take shape in the U.S. As an ISPS Graduate Policy Fellow, she will be researching how the use of assisted reproductive technologies in multi-status, queer families impacts the Immigration and Nationality Act’s hetero-normalization of sex-cells in birthright citizenship cases adjudicated in the United States.

Professor of Sociology and International and Area Studies

Julia Adams teaches and conducts research in the areas of state formation; gender and family; social theory; early modern European politics, and colonialism and empire. She is currently studying large-scale forms of patriarchal politics and the historical sociology of agency relations. She was previously the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan.

Associate Professor of Sociology
Rene Almeling is a sociologist at Yale University who specializes in research on gender and medicine. She is the author of Sex Cells, an award-winning book that offers an inside look at the American market for egg donors and sperm donors. Currently, she is completing a new book, Guynecology, on the history of medical knowledge-making about men’s reproduction and its consequences for individual men.
Kalisha Dessources

Kalisha Dessources Figures is a PhD student in Sociology at Yale University, and a Dean’s Emerging Scholar at the Graduate School of Arts and Science. Her research interests lie at the intersection of race and gender, urban poverty, and social policy, with specific focus on the ways in which the education and justice systems produce inequality for youth of color.  

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Rourke O’Brien is an Assistant Professor of Sociology. His research focuses on the causes and consequences of social and economic inequalities with substantive interests in household and public finance, economic mobility and population health.

Professor of Sociology; Associate Director Center for Cultural Sociology

Philip Smith is responsible for a dozen books and over sixty articles and chapters. Most recently he is co-author of Incivility: The Rude Stranger in Everyday Life (Cambridge 2010). He is also author of Why War? The Cultural Logic of Iraq, the Gulf War and Suez (Chicago, 2005), Punishment and Culture (Chicago, 2008). His textbook Cultural Theory: An Introduction (Blackwell 2001) has been translated into several languages and is now available in a second edition.

Asst. Prof Emma Zang
Assistant Professor of Sociology and East Asian Studies

Emma Zang’s research interests lie at the intersection of health and aging, marriage and family, and inequality. Her work aims to improve the understanding of 1) how early-life conditions affect later-life health outcomes; 2) social stratification and health; 3) spillover effects within the household exploiting policy changes.

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