Faculty Fellow

Christina Kinane
Assistant Professor, Political Science

Christina M. Kinane is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University and a Research Fellow at the Institution of Social and Policy Studies. Broadly, she studies the role of legislatures, executives, and the bureaucracy in policymaking. In particular, her current research examines how presidents strategically use vacancies in top appointments to promote their policy priorities within the framework of interbranch bargaining. Professor Kinane teaches courses on American politics and U.S. executive politics.

Arnold Wolfers Professor Emeritus of Political Science; Professor Emeritus of Management

Joseph LaPalombara is the Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science and Management Emeritus, and a Senior Research Scholar in the Center for Comparative Research. He is a member of the American and the Connecticut Academies of Arts and Sciences, and has held fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the Twentieth Century Fund, the Social Science Research Council and the Fulbright Program.

Director Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics; Senior Lecturer Political Science; Lecturer School of Management

Stephen R. Latham became Director of the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics in 2011, having been Deputy Director since 2008.  For the previous nine years, he had been Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Health Law & Policy at Quinnipiac University School of Law; during that time, he also taught business ethics at the Yale School of Management each year. Before entering academia full-time, Latham served as Director of Ethics Standards at the American Medical Association, and as secretary to its Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs.

Director, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs & Charles W. Goodyear Professor in Global Affairs, Professor of Economics and Management

Levinsohn heads the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, the home of Yale University’s undergraduate and graduate programs in Global Affairs.  He is also the co-Chair of the University Budget Committee, the university-wide committee advising the Provost on budgetary matters. In the classroom, Levinsohn teaches in both the Global Affairs programs as well as at the School of Management.

Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Ted Marmor’s scholarship primarily concerns welfare state politics and policy in North America and Western Europe. He particularly emphasizes the major spending programs, which is reflected in the second edition of The Politics of Medicare (Aldine de Gruyter, 2000) and the book written with colleagues Mashaw and Harvey in the early 1990s, America’s Misunderstood Welfare State (Basic Books, 1992).
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Rourke O’Brien is an Assistant Professor of Sociology. His research focuses on the causes and consequences of social and economic inequalities with substantive interests in household and public finance, economic mobility and population health.

Photo: Dan Renzetti, OPAC
Henry J. Heinz II Professor of Economics

Rohini Pande is the Henry J. Heinz II Professor of Economics and Director of the Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

William C Brainard Professor of Economics; Professor of Management

Professor Polak is an expert on decision theory, game theory, and economic history. His work explores economic agents whose goals are richer than those captured in traditional models. His work on game theory ranges from foundational theoretical work on common knowledge, to applied topics in corporate finance and law and economics. Most recently, he has made contributions to the theory of repeated games with asymmetric information. Other research interests include economic inequality and individuals’ responses to uncertainty.

Jennifer Richeson
Philip R. Allen Professor of Psychology
Professor Richeson’s research examines multiple psychological phenomena related to cultural diversity. Her work generally concerns the ways in which sociocultural group memberships such as race, gender, and socio-economic status impact the way people think, feel, and behave, especially during interactions with members of different sociocultural groups.
ISPS Faculty Fellow
Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Director of the Program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Douglas Rogers is Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Director of the Program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at Yale University. His research and teaching interests in political and economic anthropology; natural resources (especially oil) and energy; corporations; the anthropology of religion and ethics; historical anthropology; and socialist societies and their postsocialist trajectories.

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